Friday, October 20, 2006

 

Saga Movie Review: Boy Culture

Saga Movie Review
Boy Culture
By Nevin Jefferson
Actors
Gregory….Patrick Bauchau
Joey….Jonathon Trent II
Derek Magyar…. Darryl Stephens
X….Derek Magyar
Director….Q. Allan Brocka
Writers
Q. Allan Brocka
Philip Pierce
Matthew Rettenmund
88 minutes
Boy Culture takes place in Seattle where we find X a 26 year old hustler who confesses his tangled, romantic, relationship with his two roommates and an older, enigmatic client to the audience with our becoming the Priest behind the screen. He calls his exclusive clientele of 12 his “disciples” who‘re responsible for his BIG bank account. He spends time in the cabinet where a statue of Mary waits for him. He finds Mary’s face cunning while finding her to be sultry, alluring, and a big “Wow” in his life. Avoiding non-monetary like the plaque he’s attracted to his sexy Black roommate Andrew (Darryl Stevens) who has not quite come to terms with his sexuality. Meanwhile, his other roommate, an outrageous teen twinkie named Joey (Jonathon Trent), is madly in love with X, while screwing anything with a pulse. Boy Culture is the name of the bar where the three buds go out and lay. With the exception of X who’s not a part of this part of the gay community. With X all intimacy and feelings end ones he gets the check. The culture in the gay community for some is to have sex with no commitment, emotions, and no strings attached (n.s.a. for those of you who are into initials ). X watches with a tinge of jealously as he sees Andrew make out with tricks that he brings home. Latest elderly disciple, Gregory (the delightful debonair Patrick Bachau) who refuses to sleep with X until the desire is mutual. By denying a money-for-sex exchange, Gregory begins to break down the walls X has built around himself. He tells X how he and departed lover met and the feelings that they had for one another until death did them part. X is moved by the sentimental joy of meeting someone who shared a loving relationship with one man for 50 years. Then considers one with Andrew but lets his lesser judgment get the better of him by not wanting to give up his disciples. Committing to one person is the part of the gay community that he doesn‘t want to be a part of. Q. Allan Brocka cleverly choreographs a step by step a tragicomic dance of displaced desire as three roommates circle each other warily, uncovering layers of denial, defensiveness and role-playing complete with dips, spins, turns, and tight firm grips.
Passions heat up with Andrew asking X to attend his ex-Finance’s wedding with him and to meet his parents. The reason that Andrew was engaged to begin with because he had the hots for her brother. This sets up a road trip in a sports car convertible as X goes all out to make the adventure one that Andrew will never forget. The hilarious scenes from Andrew’s parents, their acceptance of Andrew being gay with their blaming too much Showtime for Andrew’s little sister knowing everything there is to know about being gay. Andrew’s mother tells her son while in the kitchen that she thinks that X is hot! Andrew and X are both surprised to find condoms on the nightstand left by Andrew’s dear old mom. Andrew can’t commit to X because he can’t handle the fact of his lover sleeping with other men for money. This would be too painful for him to handle. Love does conquer all but not before a closeted old rich man conquers X who rips up the check and leaves it on the silver platter. A first for X with this being his way of committing to Gregory after enjoying sex for love instead of for the money. The actors intelligently incorporate defensiveness into irony. Magyar's X smolders off the screen with repressed sensuality and the attraction between his character and Stephens' Andrew is so palpable as to render their difficulties almost comic. This builds up to a giant climatic ending with everyone living happily ever after. .A strong cast, formal visual style and witty cynical, and flip-hip, voiceover elevates the action of this gay romp that’s done in perfection Seattle style.
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